RSJ Book Chats via Zoom

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Join YWCA DE in our virtual Book Chats

Don’t know how to use Zoom it’s easy, if you have a computer or cell phone you can do it. We will show you how! Just check (x) need a lesson on the  registration form, and we will contact you.

**This program is contingent upon the health & ability of our facilitator so could be canceled at any time**

We will contact you if there are any changes, thank you for understanding.

Book Chats you can join:

Down Girl, the Logic of Misogyny by Kate Manne

Mondays 4-6pm March 23, & 30th April 6 and 13th

Waking Up White: And Finding Myself in the Story Of Race by Debby Irving

Tuesdays 5-7pm March 24, 31st, April 7 and 14th

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Wednesdays 2-4pm March 25th, April 1,8, and 15th

As Long As Grass Grows by Dina-Gilio-Whitaker

Wednesday 6-8pm March 25th, April 1,8, and 15th

We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Freedom by Bettina Love

Thursdays 10-12pm March 26th, April 2, 9, and 16th

Monster by Walter Dean Myers

Saturdays 12-2pm March 28th, April 4, 11, and 18th

Register

Book Descriptions

Down Girl, the Logic of Misogyny
by Kate Manne
Mondays 4-6pm March 23, & 30th April 6 and 13th

Misogyny is a hot topic, yet it’s often misunderstood. What is misogyny, exactly? Who deserves to be called a misogynist? How does misogyny contrast with sexism, and why is it prone to persist – or increase – even when sexist gender roles are waning? This book is an exploration of misogyny in public life and politics by the moral philosopher and writer Kate Manne. It argues that misogyny should not be understood primarily in terms of the hatred or hostility some men feel toward all or most women. Rather, it’s primarily about controlling, policing, punishing, and exiling the “bad” women who challenge male dominance. And it’s compatible with rewarding “the good ones,” and singling out other women to serve as warnings to those who are out of order. It’s also common for women to serve as scapegoats, be burned as witches, and treated as pariahs.

Manne examines recent and current events such as the Isla Vista killings by Elliot Rodger, the case of the convicted serial rapist Daniel Holtzclaw, who preyed on African-American women as a police officer in Oklahoma City, Rush Limbaugh’s diatribe against Sandra Fluke, and the “misogyny speech” of Julia Gillard, then Prime Minister of Australia, which went viral on YouTube. The book shows how these events, among others, set the stage for the 2016 US presidential election. Not only was the misogyny leveled against Hillary Clinton predictable in both quantity and quality, Manne argues it was predictable that many people would be prepared to forgive and forget regarding Donald Trump’s history of sexual assault and harassment. For this, Manne argues, is misogyny’s oft-overlooked and equally pernicious underbelly: exonerating or showing “himpathy” for the comparatively privileged men who dominate, threaten, and silence women.

Waking Up White: And Finding Myself in the Story Of Race
by Debby Irving
Tuesdays 5-7pm March 24, 31st, April 7 and 14th 

“Waking Up White is the book I wish someone had handed me decades ago. My hope is that by sharing my sometimes cringe-worthy struggle to understand racism and racial tensions, I offer a fresh perspective on bias, stereotypes, manners, and tolerance. As I unpack my own long-held beliefs about colorblindness, being a good person, and wanting to help people of color, I reveal how each of these well-intentioned mindsets actually perpetuated my ill-conceived ideas about race. I also explain why and how I’ve changed the way I talk about racism, work in racially mixed groups, and understand the racial justice movement as a whole. Exercises at the end of each chapter prompt readers to explore their own racialized ideas. Waking Up White’s personal narrative is designed to work well as a rapid read, a book group book, or support reading for courses exploring racial and cultural issues.”- Debby Irving

The Hate U Give
by Angie Thomas
Wednesdays 2-4pm March 25th, April 1,8, and 15th

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

As Long As Grass Grows
by Dina-Gilio-Whitaker
Wednesday 6-8pm March 25th, April 1,8, and 15th

“The story of Native peoples’ resistance to environmental injustice and land incursions and a call for environmentalists to learn from the indigenous community’s rich history of activism.

Through the unique lens of “Indigenized environmental justice”, indigenous researcher and activist Dina Gilio-Whitaker explores the fraught history of treaty violations, struggles for food and water security, and protection of sacred sites, while highlighting the important leadership of indigenous women in this centuries-long struggle. As Long as Grass Grows gives listeners an accessible history of indigenous resistance to government and corporate incursions on their lands and offers new approaches to environmental justice activism and policy.

Throughout 2016, the Standing Rock protest put a national spotlight on indigenous activists, but it also underscored how little Americans know about the longtime historical tensions between native peoples and the mainstream environmental movement. Ultimately, she argues, modern environmentalists must look to the history of indigenous resistance for wisdom and inspiration in our common fight for a just and sustainable future.”

We Want to Do More Than Survive:
Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Freedom
by Bettina Love
Thursdays 10-12pm March 26th, April 2, 9, and 16th

Drawing on her life’s work of teaching and researching in urban schools, Bettina Love persuasively argues that educators must teach students about racial violence, oppression, and how to make sustainable change in their communities through radical civic initiatives and movements. She argues that the US educational system is maintained by and profits from the suffering of children of color. Instead of trying to repair a flawed system, educational reformers offer survival tactics in the forms of test-taking skills, acronyms, grit labs, and character education, which Love calls the educational survival complex.

To dismantle the educational survival complex and to achieve educational freedom—not merely reform—teachers, parents, and community leaders must approach education with the imagination, determination, boldness, and urgency of an abolitionist. Following in the tradition of activists like Ella Baker, Bayard Rustin, and Fannie Lou Hamer, We Want to Do More Than Survive introduces an alternative to traditional modes of educational reform and expands our ideas of civic engagement and intersectional justice.

Monster
by Walter Dean Myers
Saturday’s 12-2pm March 28th, April 4, 11, and 18th

Sixteen-year-old Steve Harmon is on trial for murder. A Harlem drugstore owner was shot and killed in his store, and the word is that Steve served as the lookout.

Guilty or innocent, Steve becomes a pawn in the hands of “the system,” cluttered with cynical authority figures and unscrupulous inmates, who will turn in anyone to shorten their own sentences. For the first time, Steve is forced to think about who he is as he faces prison, where he may spend all the tomorrows of his life.

As a way of coping with the horrific events that entangle him, Steve, an amateur filmmaker, decides to transcribe his trial into a script, just like in the movies. He writes it all down, scene by scene, the story of how his whole life was turned around in an instant. But despite his efforts, reality is blurred and his vision obscured until he can no longer tell who he is or what is the truth. This compelling novel is Walter Dean Myers’s writing at its best.

Register